• Katharina Ribbeck, Jesse Thaler receive Edgerton Awards

    Katharina Ribbeck, Jesse Thaler receive Edgerton Awards

    Theoretical particle physicist Jesse Thaler and tissue engineering biologist Katharina Ribbeck have been awarded the 2015-2016 Harold E. Edgerton Faculty Achievement Award. Read More
  • MIT leads $317 million smart fabrics partnership

    MIT leads $317 million smart fabrics partnership

    An independent nonprofit founded by MIT has been selected to run a new, $317 million public-private partnership announced April 1 by Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter. The Advanced Functional Fibers of America (AFFOA) Institute is designed to accelerate innovation in high-tech, U.S.-based manufacturing involving fibers and textiles Read More
  • New chemistries found for liquid batteries

    New chemistries found for liquid batteries

    Liquid metal batteries, invented by MIT professor Donald Sadoway and his students a decade ago, are a promising candidate for making renewable energy more practical. The batteries can store large amounts of energy and are in the process of being commercialized by Cambridge-based startup company, Ambri.Now, Sadoway and his team have found yet another set of chemical constituents that could make the technology even more practical and affordable. Read More
  • Nanocrystal self-assembly sheds its secrets

    Nanocrystal self-assembly sheds its secrets

    The transformation of simple colloidal particles — bits of matter suspended in solution — into tightly packed, beautiful lace-like meshes, or superlattices, has puzzled researchers for decades. Through a combination of techniques including controlled solvent evaporation and synchrotron X-ray scattering, the real time self-assembly of nanocrystal structures has now become observable in-situ. Assistant Professor William A. Tisdale and grad student Mark C. Weidman, both at MIT’s Department of Chemical Engineering, and Detlef-M. Smilgies at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, reported in the journal Nature Materials. Read More
  • MIT develops nontoxic way of generating portable power

    MIT develops nontoxic way of generating portable power

    The batteries that power the ubiquitous devices of modern life, from smartphones and computers to electric cars, are mostly made of toxic materials such as lithium that can be difficult to dispose of and have limited global supplies. Now, researchers at MIT have come up with an alternative system for generating electricity, which harnesses heat and uses no metals or toxic materials. Read More
  • Four MIT faculty win Presidential Early Career Awards

    Four MIT faculty win Presidential Early Career Awards

    President Barack Obama named four MIT faculty among 105 recipients of the 2016 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE), on Thursday, Feb. 19. MIT faculty recipients of the 2016 PECASE awards, the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on early stage science and engineering researchers are (clockwise from top left): Kay Tye, Cullen Buie, Tonio Buonassisi, and William Tisdale. Read More
  • Scientists make first direct detection of gravitational waves

    Scientists make first direct detection of gravitational waves

    For the first time, scientists in the LIGO Scientific Collaboration — with a prominent role played by researchers at MIT and Caltech — have directly observed the ripples of gravitational waves in an instrument on Earth. In so doing, they have again dramatically confirmed Einstein’s theory of general relativity and opened up a new way in which to view the universe. Read More
  • Enabling human-robot rescue teams

    Enabling human-robot rescue teams

    At the annual meeting of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence, researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) presented a new way of modeling robot collaboration that reduces the need for communication by 60 percent. They believe that their model could make it easier to design systems that enable humans and robots to work together — in, for example, emergency-response teams. Read More
  • In Profile: Pablo Jarillo-Herrero

    In Profile: Pablo Jarillo-Herrero

    Scotch tape is a staple in Pablo Jarillo-Herrero’s lab. The sticky material is surprisingly effective at isolating graphene, a delicate lattice of carbon atoms that is both the thinnest and toughest material in the world. Since its discovery in 2005, graphene has been hailed as something of a miracle material, with the potential to revolutionize whole industries, from energy and electronics to health care and construction. Read More
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