Newsletter, April 2015

     
    MIT Materials News that Matters
    April 2015
     
     
    Materials Processing Center at MIT
    77 Massachusetts Avenue
    Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139facebooktwittergoogle plus
    617-253-5179
    Email:
     
    12 Summer Scholars Selected
    Undergraduates bring prior lab experience, variety of interests, to pursue research opportunities in MIT labs.
     
    The Materials Processing Center and the Center for Materials Science and Engineering have selected 12 Summer Scholars to work as undergraduate research interns at MIT from June 8 to August 8, 2015.
       2015 Summer Scholars 
    The Materials Processing Center and the Center for Materials Science and Engineering have selected 12 college interns from around the U.S. and Puerto Rico to work as Summer Scholars from June 7 to August 8, 2015. They were chosen from  among 156 applicants.

    This year's group includes the joint first author of a Nano Letters publication about improving signal-to-noise ratio at high bandwidths in solid-state nanopores; a flute player in a collegiate wind ensemble; and a materials science and engineering major with prior summer experience with the Advanced Rheometric Expansion System.

    Read more. 

    Faculty Highlight: Pablo Jarillo-Herrero 
    Physicist Pablo Jarillo-Herrero paves way for ultrathin artificial materials with dramatically different electronic and optical properties. 
     
    Pablo Jarillo-Herrero, Mitsui Career Development Associate Professor of Physics, in one of his labs at MIT. Photo, Denis Paiste, Materials Processing Center.
     Pablo Jarillo-Herrero, Mitsui Career Development            Associate Professor of Physics, in one of his labs at MIT.  Samples are graphite from different locations around the  world.

    Graphite for pencil leads and tungsten for light bulbs are two of the most common elements in everyday use. But in their thinnest form as single layers or sandwiched with another element such as tungsten diselenide or graphene coupled with boron nitride, these materials display optical and electronic properties unknown to researchers until recent years.

    "Graphene is a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, and it turns out that electrons in graphene behave as ultrarelativistic particles - as particles that move close to the speed of light. ... so this ultrarelativistic behavior manifests itself in very different electronic and optical properties," explains Pablo Jarillo-Herrero, Mitsui Career Development Associate Professor of Physics at MIT.

    "In most materials, like silicon, germanium or aluminum, electrons do not behave like that. They do not behave as ultrarelativistic particles," Jarillo-Herrero says.

     
    Probing Graphene Physics
    MIT Postdoctoral Associate Javier Sanchez-Yamagishi charts quantum signatures of electronic transport in graphene.
     
    Postdoctoral Associate Javier Sanchez-Yamagishi peels off, or exfoliates, thin layers of graphene from graphite using special tape and a silicon slab. Photo, Denis Paiste, Materials Processing Center.
    Postdoctoral Associate Javier Sanchez-Yamagishi peels off, or exfoliates, thin layers of graphene from graphite using special tape and a silicon slab.

    Over the last seven years, Javier Sanchez-Yamagishi has built several hundred nanoscale stacked graphene systems to study their electronic properties. "What interests me a lot is that the properties of this combined system depend sensitively on the relative alignment between them," he says.

    "We were trying to realize some interesting quantum states in the graphene. It's called a Quantum Spin Hall State," explains Sanchez-Yamagishi, who received his PhD in January 2015 and is now a postdoctoral associate in Associate Professor Pablo Jarillo-Herrero's group. 

    Sanchez-Yamagishi assembles sandwiches of graphene and boron nitride with various horizontal orientations. "The tricks we would use were making cleaner devices, cooling them down to low temperatures and applying very large magnetic fields to them," he says.

    Read more.

    Measuring Hot Electrons
    MIT graduate student Qiong Ma shows enhanced optical and electronic properties in graphene-hexagonal boron nitride metamaterials.

     MIT Physics graduate student Qiong Ma is doing original research on the electrical properties of grapheme-based devices using laser light stimulation. Photo, Denis Paiste
    MIT Physics graduate student Qiong Ma is doing original research on the electrical properties of graphene-based devices using laser light stimulation.

    New structures engineered by combining layers just one to several atoms thick of materials such as graphene and boron nitride feature properties distinctly different from those of the same materials' bulk crystal structures, sometimes displaying properties not found in nature, giving them the name metamaterials.

    Fifth-year MIT graduate student Qiong Ma is doing original research on the electrical properties of graphene-based devices in combination with hexagonal boron nitride, using laser light stimulation.


    "In this type of device, we can extract the most energetic electrons from graphene, and it's very fast," she says. The research showed hot carrier extraction from the approximately 10-nanometer thick film on the order of 100 femtoseconds (10-13 seconds). 

    Read more. 

    The Magic of Glass and Metal
     
    MIT Glass Lab, Forge, and Foundry
     MIT Glass Lab, Forge, and Foundry

    The Department of Materials Science and Engineering (DMSE) celebrated the reopening of the W. David Kingery Ceramics and Glass Laboratory - formerly known as the MIT Glass Lab - and the Merton C. Flemings Materials Processing Laboratory, home to MIT's forge and foundry on April 13, 2015.

    The renovation was made possible by a fundraising campaign that has raised nearly $3 million to date.

    Read more.

    IN OTHER NEWS
    Taking Aircraft Manufacturing
    Out of the Oven

    New technique uses carbon nanotube film to directly heat and cure composite materials.
     
     
    A new film of carbon nanotubes cures composites for airplane wings and fuselages, using only 1 percent of the energy required by traditional, oven-based manufacturing processes. Photo, Jose-Luis Olivares, MIT
      A new film of carbon nanotubes cures composites for    airplane wings and fuselages, using only 1 percent of    the energy required by traditional, oven-based    manufacturing processes. Photo, Jose-Luis Olivares,    MIT
     

    Composite materials used in aircraft wings and fuselages are typically manufactured in large, industrial-sized ovens: Multiple polymer layers are blasted with temperatures up to 750 degrees Fahrenheit, and solidified to form a solid, resilient material. Using this approach, considerable energy is required first to heat the oven, then the gas around it, and finally the actual composite.

    Aerospace engineers at MIT have now developed a carbon nanotube (CNT) film that can heat and solidify a composite without the need for massive ovens.

     

    Read more. 

    Join the MPC Collegium
    QR code for collegium webpage
    • Facilitation of on-campus meetings
    • Access to Collegium member only briefing materials
    • Representation on the MPC External Advisory Board
    • Customized research opportunity briefs
    • Facilitation of customized student internships
    • Medium and long-term on-campus corporate staff visits
    For more information contact Mark Beals at 617-253-2129 or mbeals@mit.edu
    Upcoming Events
     
    OSA Advanced Photonics Congress, Omni Parker House Hotel, Boston, USA,
    June 27-July 1, 2015.

    2015 MRS Fall Meeting & Exhibit, Boston, Mass., Nov. 29 - Dec. 4, 2015.
     
    Grants
     
     
    About MPC

    The goals of the Materials Processing Center are to unite the materials research community at MIT and to enhance Institute-industry interactions. Collaboration on research ventures, technology transfer, continuing education of industry personnel, and communication among industrial and governmental entities are our priorities. The MPC 
    Industry Collegium is a major vehicle for this collaboration. The MPC sponsors seminars and workshops, as well as a summer internship for talented undergraduates from universities across the U.S. We encourage interdisciplinary research collaborations and provide funds management assistance to faculty.
     
    MIT, Materials Processing Center
    77 Massachusetts Avenue
    Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139
    617-253-6472
    http://mpc-web.mit.edu
    Email: mpc@mit.edu